Food for Thought Garden

When searching for the deeper meaning of life, dig for it in the dirt.

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Ozarks' Food for Thought Garden grows more than just food; it grows people.


Ozarks' Food for Thought Garden grows food for the local community using sustainable agricultural practices. But it grows more than that. Students who volunteer to work in the garden discover that they grow too. Sure - you learn what it takes to make the garden produce fresh vegetables - but you also find yourself learning to think about man's place in the world. It's a place to channel your interests into something that is having a big impact in the local community.


Frances Adams

Frances Adams

"I have a passion for the environment. I actually am a worker in our community garden, called 'Food for Thought Garden,' which is a sustainable garden. A third of it goes to the backpack program in Clarksville Schools. The food we make in the garden kind of helps, and it's like a healthy option for kids who normally wouldn't get any vegetables."


Nena Evans

"I've always had an interest in sustainability and in sustainable agriculture, so I went on-line and found an internship in that field. I realize that it's going to be up to our generation to figure out how we are going to feed a growing world population and within the context of all the climate changes that are happening. I think the key is locally produced, sustainable agriculture. My family always had a garden as I was growing up and we tried to be as organic as possible, but during my internship I learned a lot about organic gardens on a larger scale. I learned about crop rotation and the irrigation controversy in California. I learned that organic farming can be a lot of work, but that it's definitely worth it. You get better quality and you get better yield."


Nena Evans